Blogiversary!

Well – give or take a couple of days, it’s my first Blogiversary!

In plaster

Breaking a bone in my foot which stopped me doing my favourite workouts was just the catalyst I needed – as I never have been an “ideas woman”, yet knew I needed to blog.

The idea was ultimately to give hope, not least to myself, but to anyone else for whom exercise is a way of life that’s suddenly taken away from them.me-xray-foot

I broke my fifth metatarsal in my left foot falling off the arm of the sofa whilst swatting at the smoke alarm – my boyfriend had been cooking sausages.

Gratitude is no bad thing. Today I just threw on my kit and did what I normally do, just go out for a run. This time last year that simply wasn’t an option.

therapeutic shoe - me
Ugh – just LOOK at that shoe!

We are talking a crazy-sized granny shoe and the geriatric “hobbling” which easily made me appear much older than my years.

And I’m comparatively lucky.

During the course of this blog I featured the story of Austin Rathe, who faced the real possibility of leg amputation after a road accident – and developed his resolve to run a marathon whilst recovering in hospital.

Detail from The Hostile Forces, Beethoven frieze, by Klimpt
Flab fear – I don’t want to look like this

I wanted a dancer who’d recovered from injury – and she came along in the unlikely form of Amber Kershaw, then aged nine, who’d recovered from a broken arm to street-dance on a competitive level.

Blogging is a steep learning curve and I’m still learning.

Part of the fun, of course, is seeing how well each blog post does – it really is quite fun looking at the stats.

In that respect, by far my most successful post was Maxing Out, which featured fellow blogger Christian Boyles, from Illinois, US, of Maxed Out Muscles.

guerrillas shakey selfie
Nerves? Yes! A shaky selfie just before my return to Guerrillas

 

Having suffered depression and flare-ups of Crohn’s Disease he told me: “I wanted to take control of my life and not allow myself to become sick again.”

Another high-hitter was Does Yoga Heal? a Q and A with my yoga instructor Espi Smith.

My inevitable fears over putting on weight led to an article on my pet hate – dieting. And I’ll level with you, the inevitable flabbiness caused by lack of exercise did impact on the choice of clothes I could wear for work in the unforgiving summer.

skeleton pray
Yup, I’ve learned to be grateful

Of course there were land-marks along the way in my recovery – getting the six-week all-clear at the fracture clinic, my return to running – and Guerrilla Training!

And whether I was able to run or not, I kept in regular contact with ParkRun – where, much to my surprise, I returned to do a Personal Best.

In the end it was simply a question of patience and letting the bone recover, as it inevitably did.

But this blog did (and still does , as I have no intention of finishing it) help tremendously.

So it’s true – Time really is the great healer.

Along with blogging!

The Marathon Women Who Defied Convention

It’s almost a year since I broke my foot – and started writing this blog.

In overcoming injury, it’s as much about people who say “Screw You!” to other barriers.

Like why women weren’t allowed to take part in marathons until relatively late in the 20th Century.0415_marathon-switzer

“I came home one day and I told my father I was going to be a cheerleader and I was practicing with things and he said ‘No, no you don’t want to be a cheerleader honey’.

“And I said ‘Why?’

“And he said ‘Cheerleaders are cheering on the side-lines for other people. You want to be in the game’.

“He said ‘Life is to participate, not to spectate'”.

Kathrine Switzer

The woman who became the world’s first female to complete a marathon “officially” (ie with a number) added – “What a thing to tell your little girl!”

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Switzer gets into her stride with her coach Arnie Briggs (wearing number 490)

What a thing indeed – given the fact that, as Switzer made history by running the Boston Marathon in 1967 aged 20, this paternal advice would’ve been given her in the 50’s, a period more associated with women belonging in the home rather than enjoying the same challenges as the men.

The Boston event is renowned for being tough – “It has humbled the greatest of runners,” according to the Chief Running Officer of Runner’s World, Bart Yasso.

With more then a hint of sarcasm, in a later interview, Switzer challenged the assumptions made in the 60’s – by people less broad-minded than her father:

“The idea of running long distance was always considered, very questionable for women, because any arduous activity would mean that you’re going to get big legs, grow a moustache and hair on your chest – and your uterus was going to fall out!”

1966
Bobbi Gibb after the 1966 Boston Marathon (photo courtesy of Yarrow Kraner)

In 1966 Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb hid in bushes at the start of the same event then merely joined in with the other runners – going on to complete the full distance.

Her application had been rejected by the race director mainly on the grounds that females were, supposedly, simply not physiologically capable of going that distance – yet the crowds cheered and cheered once they saw a woman running.

The following year, K V Switzer signed off her entry form using just her initials for her first names – thus giving no indication she wasn’t a guy.

At first it all went well, as the journalism student from Syracuse University pounded along with her coach Arnie Briggs and boyfriend “Big Tom” Miller, attracting cheerful surprise from the other runners when they realised she was a female.

But then the race organisers riding on the press bus spotted her.

“One of them was this feisty character by the name of Jock Semple. He just stopped the bus, jumped off and ran after me.

“Suddenly I turned and he just grabbed me and screamed at me ‘Get the Hell out of my race and give me those numbers!’

“And then he started clawing at me, started trying to rip my numbers off – and I was so surprised.

“He had the fiercest face of any guy I’d ever seen, and out of control, really. I was terrified!”

 espnw_a_switzer1_mb_576_576

As you can see in the pictures above, Switzer’s boyfriend, a hammer thrower, reacted arguably a little over zealously!

Anyway, if you’ve read as far as down here, you’ll want to know her finishing time – which was approximately 4 hours 20 minutes.

Switzer’s marathon glory days were only just beginning – she went on to win the women’s section of the 1974 New York City Marathon with a time of 3:07:29.

The following year she returned to the Boston Marathon – this time finishing second behind the German Liane Winter, whose win created a new world record at 2:42:24.

If any of the information in this post is factually inaccurate – and I sincerely hope it isn’t – please feel free to comment below.