Spirit of the Marathon

It’s just hours since both the media and social media celebrated the selfless behaviour of the Swansea Harriers runner who gave up his race time to help another guy who was clearly struggling in the London Marathon.

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Picture: Sky News

Matthew Rees, 29, was shown physically supporting David Wyeth, of Chorlton Runners, whose legs “just crumbled” just 200 yards from the finish line.

A marshal also stepped in, and with the finish completed at a walk, both runners still managed a respectable sub three-hour time.

Thousands of viewers must’ve seen the live footage of the troubled runner, first named by concerned TV commentators as David Wyeth, while he staggered exhausted and jelly-legged and at one point appeared to totally collapse to the ground just off camera.

Maybe this, then, could not have been one of his finest moments?

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Pic: BBC

Rees told reporters he had been preparing to sprint the end of the race, but that helping Wyeth was “more important” than improving on his time.

In a Sky News article he said: “[David Wyeth] was really grateful, but he wasn’t very coherent, he was just like ‘I have to finish, I have to finish’.

“And I said ‘you will finish, you will get there, come on let’s do this’.”

Race organisers Tweeted that Rees “encompassed everything that’s so special about the #LondonMarathon”.

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Pic: PA

 

 

He’s being rightly hailed as a hero – but he’s not the only one.

Wyeth was running to raise money for the hospice which helped his late uncle.

His relatives have since Tweeted to say he’s now fine – and “recovering with a burger and a beer”.

A pic posted by a cousin reveals a confident face totally different to the confused but resolute expression shown in The Mall today.

David Wyeth’s determination to finish – when every reserve in his body had been used-up – is surely worthy of any marathon hero since Pheidippides.

 

 

 

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When you can’t run the London Marathon

I’m one of the many runners who won’t be taking part in today’s London Marathon – but that’s for the simple and shockingly straightforward reason that I haven’t entered it!London Marathon - Eddie Keogh Reuters

Consider then, the poor individuals who have – but who’ve had to pull out through injury or illness.

One of my former work colleagues says on FaceBook he’s “gutted” he’s had to sit this one out, but urges other runners “have a great race and soak up the atmosphere”.

But the good news – for those who got in via the ballot – is if you had to withdraw your entry through illness or injury the organisers say they will guarantee you an entry for the 2018 event – as long as you follow these guidelines, that is!

Good Luck to everyone taking part today.

 

We’re still not doing enough – apparently!

Women are 36 per cent less likely than men to be physically active.

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Are we stretching ourselves enough?

That’s according to new research by the British Heart Foundation which claims this lack of physical inactivity in both sexes is likely to cause as many deaths as smoking.

And the study goes on to say a third of British people are at risk of heart disease because of a lack of exercise.

Now if you look at the date my last blog post you’ll see I’m guilty of a lack of blogging activity!

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Feline fine  – I have no exercise statistics for cats

My observations would simply be that if you don’t really like exercise then it’s hardly going to be a regular part of your life (just like the “strict diet” we’ve all announced we’re going on at some stage and which usually lasts the best part of one morning).

We are told two million Brits are apparently not meeting government targets of how physically active we should be.

Government targets? Yes, apparently they do exist for fitness. (Take a look at the NHS-recommended ones here.)

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Nobody LIKES burpees

The idea of the government telling us to get fit and healthy (almost Orwellian!) – once inspired me to write an article for BBC News on how MPs get fit. Do they practice what their employers preach?

Of course I’m going to come back to why it’s women who are taking significantly less exercise.

I don’t see a marked lack of females when I do my Guerrilla training. If anything the men are outnumbered, especially in the morning classes and at weekends.

So what’s happening?

After all, this report has highlighted the fact that even “active” people are at risk if they don’t do vigorous exercise.

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No it’s  the other way round

Now while I’ve yet to meet anyone who actually enjoys doing things like star jumps and burpees – it’s stuff like that that can really make the difference – and, as many women will testify, gives them more body confidence when they hit the town or get into their bikinis!

Of course it goes beyond worrying about your appearance – Thank God – and I’d like to think we’re past the idea of exercise being unladylike or unfeminine.

Women’s sport is getting more coverage – just look at the Oxford/Cambridge boat race coverage at the weekend.

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We know, we know

But then I’m looking more at exercise being a lifestyle thing rather than something competitive.

Adele’s gone on the record saying she hates exercise.

And speaking as somebody who heartily loathed P.E. and sports days at school, I don’t think anybody should be forced into it.

So I’m wondering – could this element of feeling one is being coerced be the reason one GP-referral programme of council-funded fitness classes was recently axed?

South Tyneside Council said only 17% of participants completed it and less than 10% became more active.

But whatever the reason, I’m pretty sure it had nothing to do with gender!